Braille Font

Braille

About Braille Font

Braille is a writing and reading system for the visually impaired and blind people. It comprises raised dots that can be ‘read’ by touching. The basic element is a rectangular ‘cell’ made of six dots and arranged in two vertical columns of three dots.

Notably, the arrangement of each dot represents a different number or letter. For example, the letter ‘A’ is made up of a single dot, the letter ‘B’ is denoted by two vertically aligned dots, while ‘C’ is two horizontally aligned dots.

In the same exact way, the Braille font was created for use printed materials. So, the Braille Font offers 63 different dot combinations to make numbers, the alphabet, abbreviations, and punctuation marks. The font was named after the inventor, Louis Braille, who was born in 1809 in France.

At the age of three, Louis accidentally pricked one of his eyes with a metallic tool from his father’s workshop. He later developed complications that resulted in the doctors declaring him blind in both eyes. Louis attended a school for the Blind in Paris. He could not understand the awkward raised tactile print letters that were being used for reading at that time.

The fact that there was no easier way of writing or reading for blind people was a persistent source of frustration for Louis. Eventually, he developed what we call the Braille Font.

Currently, the Braille Font is used across the globe in many languages. It is the perfect text for vision-impaired people who want to learn. Any written information can now be presented in braille including books, mathematics, music, and knitting patterns.

Inspired by a tactile ‘night writing’ system containing dot patterns, the Braille Font finally uncovered the six dot blend of tactile print after many years of experimentation.

The Braille Font can now be read on embossed paper. Alternatively, it can be read by using refreshable braille displays that connect to smartphone devices and computers. Braille Font comes in handy when it comes to printing written materials. 

There are two grades of the Braille Font. That is the Grade 1 and Grade 2 font. First, Grade 1 includes the braille alphabet, numbers, and punctuations. Note that this is equivalent to the print alphabet. The visually impaired learning braille usually being with Grade 1. However, this form occupies a huge space that makes Grade 1 braille books bulkier as compared to print books.

On the other hand, the Grade 2 Braille Font is used for more complicated texts. That includes novels and large documents. Mainly, that is because it takes up less space. For example, using the grade 2 system, the word ‘braille’ is written as ‘brl’. The shorter words are, the lesser the finger travel across a line. That makes reading speed faster.

Computer technology has transformed the use of braille. For example, you can now use the Braille Font can be used in a braille display (also called a screen reader), A braille keyboard, Scanners, Telebraille III (transcribes written text and displays it in braille).

If you would want to print reading materials for vision-impaired people, just download the Braille Font.

Character Map

  • A A
  • B B
  • C C
  • D D
  • E E
  • F F
  • G G
  • H H
  • I I
  • J J
  • K K
  • L L
  • M M
  • N N
  • O O
  • P P
  • Q Q
  • R R
  • S S
  • T T
  • U U
  • V V
  • W W
  • X X
  • Y Y
  • Z Z
  • a a
  • b b
  • c c
  • d d
  • e e
  • f f
  • g g
  • h h
  • i i
  • j j
  • k k
  • l l
  • m m
  • n n
  • o o
  • p p
  • q q
  • r r
  • s s
  • t t
  • u u
  • v v
  • w w
  • x x
  • y y
  • z z
  • 0 0
  • 1 1
  • 2 2
  • 3 3
  • 4 4
  • 5 5
  • 6 6
  • 7 7
  • 8 8
  • 9 9
  • ! !
  • @ @
  • # #
  • $ $
  • % %
  • ^ ^
  • * *
  • ( (
  • ) )
  • - -
  • _ _
  • + +
  • = =
  • { {
  • } }
  • [ [
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  • \ \
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